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Ashley welcome to your Home Energy Plan for 57 Tavistock Road

Property Type

End-Terrace

Bedrooms

3

Postcode

N4 1DB

Survey Date

10/06/2024

Welcome to your Home Energy Plan

Homes can be retrofitted with a wide range of improvements such as insulation, heating, and renewable energy systems. To maximise benefits, improvements need to be delivered in a structured manner, considering the household's priorities, budget, and expectations.

This plan is designed to help you to select the home energy improvements that are best for you and your home. Along with a follow-up consultation, it represents the end of the first stage of your Furbnow Retrofit journey.

Your retrofit coordinator's advice in this plan is based on the survey of your home. It identifies specific improvements to make your home more comfortable, reduce energy usage and lower carbon emissions.

If you have any questions or want to make changes, we'll discuss those on the consultation call after you've reviewed your plan. At that point, we'll also cover how to start your project.

You can contact the Furbnow team for advice anytime!

Adriana Rivera

Furbnow

Operations Team

hello@furbnow.com

078 5738 7628

Adam Wilson

Your Retrofit Coordinator

TrustMarkElmhurst Energy

Section Overview

Your Survey

The importance of your survey

The survey is a critical part of your Home Energy Plan to ensure accurate and tailored advice. It was conducted by a qualified assessor who visited your property to collect data on its condition and energy performance.

You'll find the outputs of the survey attached at the bottom of this page and in the documents section of your dashboard. These documents have informed this plan and typically include a:

  • Condition or Assessment Report documenting the survey findings

  • Improvement Options Evaluation introducing the possible improvements to your property

  • Medium Term Improvement Plan outlining the suggested phasing of improvements to your property

Ashley Smith

57 Tavistock Road

Postcode

N4 1DB

Survey Date

10/06/2024

Bedrooms

3

Property Type

End-Terrace

Modelling Assumptions

Assumptions about your property

The assumptions below are based on our understanding of your property and properties like yours. We've detailed them to summarise details of your property that can influence this plan's guidance.

Implications for your plan

We factor these assumptions into our analysis to ensure the recommendations for your home meet the legal and practical requirements of your property. If any need validation later, they will be detailed in the Project Considerations section.

Your property is not a listed building and is not within a conservation area.

The wall construction is largely of solid construction

The porch to the property has been excluded from the thermal envelope

Various areas of repointing are required on the external façade.

Note the improvements in the plan are compounded improvements and therefore differ from the individual measures

Your Priorities

Understanding your priorities and goals

Aligning on your priorities will help us deliver a project that meets your expectations. We want to ensure that we're working to your needs and budget, with a view to maximising your home's potential.

Make the home more comfortable for both present and future use.

The roof needs repairs, and we are considering installing new Velux windows while incorporating energy efficiency measures simultaneously.

Prioritise the replacement of single glazing, and ideally keeping either timber-framed or aluminium windows.

Your Improvement Potential

Measuring improvements

We consider 3 measures of efficiency. An EPC energy rating, annual fuel bill and CO2 emissions. You will also see increased comfort and a healthier home, which are a bit trickier to measure. That said, an efficient home can be kept at the desired temperature more easily throughout the year!

Whilst far from perfect, we use EPC energy ratings as they're the standard measure in the UK. As most homes have one they represent a reasonable basis for comparison.

Fuel bills represent the energy usage of your home, they are directly related to the efficiency of your home and your household's daily energy demands.

The environmental impact of your energy usage is most simply measured in CO2 emitted. That CO2 emission is a result of electricity generation in power stations and mains gas use at home.

Estimating efficiency improvements

In the table below you'll find the before and after figures for our 3 measures of efficiency. The change here represents the improvements you can expect from delivering your home energy project.

An EPC energy rating was calculated for your home as part of the survey and we can sensibly estimate the impact the improvements below would have on that rating. Please note that energy ratings are dependent on the improvements being installed in the order proposed.

If you shared your annual fuel bill before the survey, we've estimated your fuel bill after the improvements assuming that your day to day behaviours remain unchanged. CO2 emission reductions also assume that day to day behaviours remain unchanged.

Before

60 D

Existing EPC score

£3722

Existing annual fuel bill

7650kg

Existing C02 per year

These figures are estimates based on the modelling assumptions of your home and do not align to actual figures from your energy bill.

After

77 C

New EPC score

£2361

New annual fuel bill

3594kg

New C02 per year

These estimates are based on the installation of all recommended measures below in relation to your existing figures and currently lodged EPC data.

The impact on your home's value

Investing in an efficient home can significantly increase your house price by making it more attractive to potential buyers. Lower energy bills, a smaller environmental footprint, and a comfortable living environment are increasingly appealing features for buyers, ultimately raising the value and market appeal of your property.

Estimating future property value

This figure is based on a government report analysing 300,000 property sales in England. The report found that energy-saving improvements could increase property value by 14% on average, and up to 38% in some parts of England.

You're property is currently worth

These measures could deliver an estimated 7.0% price increase

Resulting in a property worth

Your Home Energy Improvements

Home energy improvements explained

A home energy project typically includes several individual home energy improvements.

When planning a retrofit, there are many improvement options available. Your retrofit coordinator has selected a shortlist of improvements based on your survey to meet your priorities.

While we talk about home energy improvements, the industry often refers to energy efficiency measures. The terms are interchangeable, so if you see 'energy efficiency measure' or 'measure' mentioned it's referring to a home energy improvement.

Selecting the improvements that meet your needs

Below is an overview of the proposed improvements for your project and their benefits. The reasoning for each improvement is detailed in the next section on Project Phases.

Please note that energy rating scores are dependent on the improvements being installed in the order proposed. We can work with you to determine which ones to proceed with and discuss their expected impact.

You may not wish to carry out some of the improvements for various reasons. We can work around this to customise your plan to your needs including moving improvements between phases. Once you've reviewed this plan, we'll discuss any questions and confirm your selected improvements on your consultation call.

Overview of your improvements

This is a summary of the improvements proposed for your home and the benefits they could deliver. The reasoning for each improvement is detailed in the next section on Project Phases.

Please note that energy rating scores are dependent on the improvements being installed in the order proposed.

Suspended Floor Insulation
Estimated Cost
£1500
Energy Rating
+1
Estimated Monthly Savings
£6.33
Estimated Annual Savings
£76.00
Estimated Monthly CO2 Savings
7.67kg
Estimated Annual CO2 Savings
92.00kg
Flat Roof Insulation
Estimated Cost
£5000
Energy Rating
+2
Estimated Monthly Savings
£9.00
Estimated Annual Savings
£108.00
Estimated Monthly CO2 Savings
4.50kg
Estimated Annual CO2 Savings
54.00kg
Upgrade Room-in-Roof Insulation
Estimated Cost
£2100
Energy Rating
+1
Estimated Monthly Savings
£22.42
Estimated Annual Savings
£269.00
Estimated Monthly CO2 Savings
1.83kg
Estimated Annual CO2 Savings
22.00kg
Solar PV
Estimated Cost
£4500
Energy Rating
+8
Estimated Monthly Savings
£61.17
Estimated Annual Savings
£734.00
Estimated Monthly CO2 Savings
38.08kg
Estimated Annual CO2 Savings
457.00kg
Replace the External Kitchen Door
Estimated Cost
£2000
Energy Rating
+1
Estimated Monthly Savings
£4.50
Estimated Annual Savings
£54.00
Estimated Monthly CO2 Savings
1.75kg
Estimated Annual CO2 Savings
21.00kg
Mechanical Extract Ventilation
Estimated Cost
£350
Energy Rating
0
Estimated Monthly Savings
£0.00
Estimated Annual Savings
£0.00
Estimated Monthly CO2 Savings
-
Estimated Annual CO2 Savings
-
Air Source Heat Pump
Estimated Cost
£11993
Grant available
Energy Rating
+4
Estimated Monthly Savings
£10.00
Estimated Annual Savings
£120.00
Estimated Monthly CO2 Savings
284.17kg
Estimated Annual CO2 Savings
3410.00kg
Totals
Estimated Cost
£27443
Grant available
Energy Rating
77 C
Estimated Monthly Savings
£113.42
Estimated Annual Savings
£1361.00
Estimated Monthly CO2 Savings
338.00kg
Estimated Annual CO2 Savings
4056.00kg

Heat Pump grant savings - Boiler Upgrade Scheme

The cost we show for a heat pump measure in your Plan, does not take into account the £7,500 grant available from the Boiler Upgrade Scheme (BUS). Most people getting a heat pump will qualify for this, so please discuss this with us to confirm your eligibility.

Project Phases

Project phases explained

We group home energy improvements into phases to suggest an appropriate order for implementation and highlight critical interactions between them and other possible works to your home.

Phase 1 improvements can be implemented now, while later phases can follow. Some improvements should be installed together, and some are independent of each other.

Repairs and defects are typically addressed first, followed by building fabric improvements, heating systems, and renewables. Your retrofit coordinator can advise you on the best order for your home during the consultation call.

Changing your phases

The project phases are recommendations. We will work with you to ensure you are happy with your project phases. Any changes you'd like to make can be discussed with your retrofit coordinator on your consultation call.

Phase 01

Addressing your main priority.

Phase 01

Major Fabric

Upgrade Room-in-Roof Insulation

Cost:

£2100

Savings:

£269.00

CO2 Savings:

22.00kg

All figures are estimated

Reasoning for this measure

Repairs to Roof, New Velux Windows and Upgrade Room-in-Roof Insulation


We discussed during our phone call the inclusion of roof repairs and the installation of three Velux windows within the first phase of your Retrofit Plan. These costs are estimated based on square meters and would require further input from contractors to provide accurate costs.


During our survey, it was noted that the stud walls in the roof room were insulated with 75mm mineral wool, which was in poor condition. The joists beneath the loft boards have 75-100mm of loose fill vermiculite/cellulose-type insulation, which could possibly contain amphibole asbestos. No insulation was observed on the rafters above the sloped ceiling.


As part of the roof repairs or replacement works, we recommend upgrading the insulation in the room-in-roof. This should be designed to encapsulate the entire roof space while maintaining ventilation. In our telephone conversation, we discussed that removing plasterboard and replacing it with insulated plasterboard may be too disruptive to consider. Therefore, we should explore options to insulate from above as part of the roofing works, creating a 'warm roof' system. Although this method can be more costly than insulating from the inside, it reduces disruption during the works. The process is as follows:

  1. Roof trusses and purlins are exposed by removing tiles or slates, battens, and counter-battens.
  2. A sloping base is constructed by affixing wooden panels or boards to these exposed elements.
  3. A damp-proof membrane is securely attached to this newly formed base.
  4. Next, insulation is applied, typically consisting of rigid panels such as extruded polystyrene, polyurethane, or wood fibers, ensuring enhanced thermal efficiency.
  5. Finally, a fresh set of battens and counter-battens are installed onto a rainscreen membrane, providing a foundation for the reinstallation of tiles or slates.


If the option to insulate from the exterior is considered, then the existing vermiculite/cellulose-type insulation beneath the joists may not be disturbed. However, any materials suspected of containing asbestos should be tested by an appropriately qualified person, and appropriate removal techniques should be adopted if there is any doubt that the material may be disturbed.


Although our software does not predict significant annual savings or EPC improvement from this measure, fully insulating your roof space will improve the thermal comfort of your room-in-roof, with actual savings likely to be higher than predicted.

Phase 01

Major Fabric

Upgrade Room-in-Roof Insulation

Cost:

£2100

Savings:

£269.00

CO2 Savings:

22.00kg

All figures are estimated

Reasoning for this measure

Repairs to Roof, New Velux Windows and Upgrade Room-in-Roof Insulation


We discussed during our phone call the inclusion of roof repairs and the installation of three Velux windows within the first phase of your Retrofit Plan. These costs are estimated based on square meters and would require further input from contractors to provide accurate costs.


During our survey, it was noted that the stud walls in the roof room were insulated with 75mm mineral wool, which was in poor condition. The joists beneath the loft boards have 75-100mm of loose fill vermiculite/cellulose-type insulation, which could possibly contain amphibole asbestos. No insulation was observed on the rafters above the sloped ceiling.


As part of the roof repairs or replacement works, we recommend upgrading the insulation in the room-in-roof. This should be designed to encapsulate the entire roof space while maintaining ventilation. In our telephone conversation, we discussed that removing plasterboard and replacing it with insulated plasterboard may be too disruptive to consider. Therefore, we should explore options to insulate from above as part of the roofing works, creating a 'warm roof' system. Although this method can be more costly than insulating from the inside, it reduces disruption during the works. The process is as follows:

  1. Roof trusses and purlins are exposed by removing tiles or slates, battens, and counter-battens.
  2. A sloping base is constructed by affixing wooden panels or boards to these exposed elements.
  3. A damp-proof membrane is securely attached to this newly formed base.
  4. Next, insulation is applied, typically consisting of rigid panels such as extruded polystyrene, polyurethane, or wood fibers, ensuring enhanced thermal efficiency.
  5. Finally, a fresh set of battens and counter-battens are installed onto a rainscreen membrane, providing a foundation for the reinstallation of tiles or slates.


If the option to insulate from the exterior is considered, then the existing vermiculite/cellulose-type insulation beneath the joists may not be disturbed. However, any materials suspected of containing asbestos should be tested by an appropriately qualified person, and appropriate removal techniques should be adopted if there is any doubt that the material may be disturbed.


Although our software does not predict significant annual savings or EPC improvement from this measure, fully insulating your roof space will improve the thermal comfort of your room-in-roof, with actual savings likely to be higher than predicted.

Phase 01

Renewables & Low Carbon

Solar PV

Cost:

£4500

Savings:

£734.00

CO2 Savings:

457.00kg

All figures are estimated

Reasoning for this measure

We discussed that a well-sized Solar PV array may not be possible due to the installation of new Velux windows. However, I have based your system on a 4kWp array, which may be split over the South/North elevations of the roof. This proposal is indicative and would require further input from an installer to establish the possible array.


I have included Solar PV within 'Phase 1' as it could be cost-effective to install in-line solar panels during the repair and insulation works to the existing roof. If you choose to consider Solar PV at a later date, a subsequent cost for scaffolding will be required. In-line Solar Panels may be difficult to install following the installation of room-in-roof insulation; therefore, a mounted system would be the more appropriate choice if you wish to install PV at a later date.


If you choose to incorporate a new roof, Velux windows, Room-in-Roof insulation, and Solar PV, we would look to appoint a single contractor capable of carrying out all measures and repairs to ensure quality and continuity of work.


I've not included a battery in these phases because as discussed we will keep the potential outside locations for it free for an Air Source Heat Pump. There is always the possibility to add a battery later with more data about electricity generation and how well it matches to your demand profile, and after a heat pump is installed so we have certainty about a potential location.

Phase 01

Renewables & Low Carbon

Solar PV

Cost:

£4500

Savings:

£734.00

CO2 Savings:

457.00kg

All figures are estimated

Reasoning for this measure

We discussed that a well-sized Solar PV array may not be possible due to the installation of new Velux windows. However, I have based your system on a 4kWp array, which may be split over the South/North elevations of the roof. This proposal is indicative and would require further input from an installer to establish the possible array.


I have included Solar PV within 'Phase 1' as it could be cost-effective to install in-line solar panels during the repair and insulation works to the existing roof. If you choose to consider Solar PV at a later date, a subsequent cost for scaffolding will be required. In-line Solar Panels may be difficult to install following the installation of room-in-roof insulation; therefore, a mounted system would be the more appropriate choice if you wish to install PV at a later date.


If you choose to incorporate a new roof, Velux windows, Room-in-Roof insulation, and Solar PV, we would look to appoint a single contractor capable of carrying out all measures and repairs to ensure quality and continuity of work.


I've not included a battery in these phases because as discussed we will keep the potential outside locations for it free for an Air Source Heat Pump. There is always the possibility to add a battery later with more data about electricity generation and how well it matches to your demand profile, and after a heat pump is installed so we have certainty about a potential location.

Summary of improvements in phase 01

Upgrade Room-in-Roof Insulation
Estimated Cost
£2100
Energy Rating
+1
Monthly Savings
£22.42
Estimated Annual Savings
£269.00
Monthly CO2 Savings
1.83kg
Annual CO2 Savings
22.00kg
Solar PV
Estimated Cost
£4500
Energy Rating
+8
Monthly Savings
£61.17
Estimated Annual Savings
£734.00
Monthly CO2 Savings
38.08kg
Annual CO2 Savings
457.00kg
Totals
Estimated Cost
£6600
Energy Rating
-
Monthly Savings
£83.58
Estimated Annual Savings
£1003.00
Monthly CO2 Savings
39.92kg
Annual CO2 Savings
479.00kg

Phase 02

Sensible fabric measures with adequate ventilation.

Phase 02

Major Fabric

Suspended Floor Insulation

Cost:

£1500

Savings:

£76.00

CO2 Savings:

92.00kg

All figures are estimated

Reasoning for this measure

An uninsulated suspended floor can result in up to 30% of the heat loss from a building – especially when the crawlspace is heavily ventilated as indicate by the air bricks in the walls outside. There are two main installation options:


1) to add insulation between the ground floor joists - either using rigid boards or a insulating wool (i.e. mineral wool). The floorboard may required to be lifted and furniture/floor removed to allow for the installation


2) a vapour-open spray foam insulation which can be completed without lifting the floorboards. This requires less disruption but will require a technical survey to check the humidty levels under the floor. The cost of any replacement flooring is not included in the pricing and should be taken into account when selecting the option to take forward.

Phase 02

Major Fabric

Suspended Floor Insulation

Cost:

£1500

Savings:

£76.00

CO2 Savings:

92.00kg

All figures are estimated

Reasoning for this measure

An uninsulated suspended floor can result in up to 30% of the heat loss from a building – especially when the crawlspace is heavily ventilated as indicate by the air bricks in the walls outside. There are two main installation options:


1) to add insulation between the ground floor joists - either using rigid boards or a insulating wool (i.e. mineral wool). The floorboard may required to be lifted and furniture/floor removed to allow for the installation


2) a vapour-open spray foam insulation which can be completed without lifting the floorboards. This requires less disruption but will require a technical survey to check the humidty levels under the floor. The cost of any replacement flooring is not included in the pricing and should be taken into account when selecting the option to take forward.

Phase 02

Major Fabric

Flat Roof Insulation

Cost:

£5000

Savings:

£108.00

CO2 Savings:

54.00kg

All figures are estimated

Reasoning for this measure

There is a flat roof extension to the rear of the property where the kitchen is located and also an (assumed) uninsulated front elevation.


Insulating the roofs can significantly reduce heat loss - up to 20% of heat can be lost through the roof, so we are recommending flat roof insulation. Flat roofs have a longevity of approximately 15 years.


The insulation can be placed either above or below the roof. If the insulation is placed above the roof, the roof itself stays warm. For this reason, it is called ‘warm deck’ insulation. If the insulation is placed below the roof, the roof itself will be cold.


Warm deck insulation has advantages over cold deck insulation but is more expensive because of the significant cost of re-roofing. This method removes the possibility of condensation forming on the underside of the deck, eliminates damp and has the added advantage that it does not disrupt the living space within the dwelling. Unlike the cold roof method, the thickness of insulation you can install is not limited by the depth of the timber rafters/joists.


The cost included assumed "cold deck" insulation as the costs of re-roofing are not included. Ensuring this is sufficient ventilation to manage moisture in this space will be essential.

Phase 02

Major Fabric

Flat Roof Insulation

Cost:

£5000

Savings:

£108.00

CO2 Savings:

54.00kg

All figures are estimated

Reasoning for this measure

There is a flat roof extension to the rear of the property where the kitchen is located and also an (assumed) uninsulated front elevation.


Insulating the roofs can significantly reduce heat loss - up to 20% of heat can be lost through the roof, so we are recommending flat roof insulation. Flat roofs have a longevity of approximately 15 years.


The insulation can be placed either above or below the roof. If the insulation is placed above the roof, the roof itself stays warm. For this reason, it is called ‘warm deck’ insulation. If the insulation is placed below the roof, the roof itself will be cold.


Warm deck insulation has advantages over cold deck insulation but is more expensive because of the significant cost of re-roofing. This method removes the possibility of condensation forming on the underside of the deck, eliminates damp and has the added advantage that it does not disrupt the living space within the dwelling. Unlike the cold roof method, the thickness of insulation you can install is not limited by the depth of the timber rafters/joists.


The cost included assumed "cold deck" insulation as the costs of re-roofing are not included. Ensuring this is sufficient ventilation to manage moisture in this space will be essential.

Phase 02

Windows and Doors

Replace the External Kitchen Door

Cost:

£2000

Savings:

£54.00

CO2 Savings:

21.00kg

All figures are estimated

Reasoning for this measure

Currently the door from the kitchen to the garage is wooden with roughly 50% single glazed glass. This will mean there is significant heat loss going from the kitchen into the garage due to lack of insulation and lack of seal between the door and the frame.


Replacing the wooden back door with a insulated UPVC or composite door will significantly reduce heat loss and draughts in the kitchen space, due to improved thermal performance and increased air-tightness.

Phase 02

Windows and Doors

Replace the External Kitchen Door

Cost:

£2000

Savings:

£54.00

CO2 Savings:

21.00kg

All figures are estimated

Reasoning for this measure

Currently the door from the kitchen to the garage is wooden with roughly 50% single glazed glass. This will mean there is significant heat loss going from the kitchen into the garage due to lack of insulation and lack of seal between the door and the frame.


Replacing the wooden back door with a insulated UPVC or composite door will significantly reduce heat loss and draughts in the kitchen space, due to improved thermal performance and increased air-tightness.

Phase 02

Ventilation

Mechanical Extract Ventilation

Cost:

£350

Savings:

£0.00

CO2 Savings:

0.00kg

All figures are estimated

Reasoning for this measure

We recommend decentralised mechanical extract ventilation to ensure there is suitable ventilation in the kitchen and bathroom to prevent a build up of moisture. This means standalone extractor fans that can be toggled and/or humidity controlled.


Extraction ventilation over the cooking area should be planned into the kitchen design and the appropriate ducting installed. A cooker hood is recommended with an intermittent air extraction rate of 60l/s (or 213m3/h).


A continuous extractor fan with humidity sensor is appropriate to reduce risk of damp and mould in the bathroom.

Phase 02

Ventilation

Mechanical Extract Ventilation

Cost:

£350

Savings:

£0.00

CO2 Savings:

0.00kg

All figures are estimated

Reasoning for this measure

We recommend decentralised mechanical extract ventilation to ensure there is suitable ventilation in the kitchen and bathroom to prevent a build up of moisture. This means standalone extractor fans that can be toggled and/or humidity controlled.


Extraction ventilation over the cooking area should be planned into the kitchen design and the appropriate ducting installed. A cooker hood is recommended with an intermittent air extraction rate of 60l/s (or 213m3/h).


A continuous extractor fan with humidity sensor is appropriate to reduce risk of damp and mould in the bathroom.

Summary of improvements in phase 02

Suspended Floor Insulation
Estimated Cost
£1500
Energy Rating
+1
Monthly Savings
£6.33
Estimated Annual Savings
£76.00
Monthly CO2 Savings
7.67kg
Annual CO2 Savings
92.00kg
Flat Roof Insulation
Estimated Cost
£5000
Energy Rating
+2
Monthly Savings
£9.00
Estimated Annual Savings
£108.00
Monthly CO2 Savings
4.50kg
Annual CO2 Savings
54.00kg
Replace the External Kitchen Door
Estimated Cost
£2000
Energy Rating
+1
Monthly Savings
£4.50
Estimated Annual Savings
£54.00
Monthly CO2 Savings
1.75kg
Annual CO2 Savings
21.00kg
Mechanical Extract Ventilation
Estimated Cost
£350
Energy Rating
0
Monthly Savings
£0.00
Estimated Annual Savings
£0.00
Monthly CO2 Savings
-
Annual CO2 Savings
-
Totals
Estimated Cost
£8850
Energy Rating
-
Monthly Savings
£19.83
Estimated Annual Savings
£238.00
Monthly CO2 Savings
-
Annual CO2 Savings
-

Phase 03

Reducing your carbon emissions.

Phase 03

Major Heating and Hot Water

Air Source Heat Pump

Cost:

£11993

Savings:

£120.00

CO2 Savings:

3410.00kg

All figures are estimated

Reasoning for this measure

Air Source Heat Pumps, when installed correctly alongside the upgrade of existing pipework and radiators, can significantly reduce carbon emissions, as demonstrated by the Annual CO2 Savings. However, since electricity is currently more expensive than gas, the energy bill savings are typically lower than expected.


During our discussion, we briefly considered the installation of an Air Source Heat Pump but determined that addressing the roof and single glazing should take priority. In retrofit projects, a "Fabric First" approach is often encouraged, as the most cost-effective energy is the energy we don't consume. However, if you aim to significantly reduce your carbon emissions, it may be worth considering the early installation of an Air Source Heat Pump in your plan.


Please note that extensive upgrades to pipework and radiators are often necessary, including increasing the size of existing radiators, particularly in older properties. Contractors should conduct a Heat Pump assessment before submitting their proposal to determine the extent of the required works for heat pump installation. Grants are currently available for Air Source Heat Pumps in homes that have a valid Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) with no outstanding recommendations for loft or cavity wall insulation (source: link). The grant levels for heat pumps have been increased to £7,500, with funding confirmed until March 2028.


By establishing the presence of cavity walls and insulating them, as well as ensuring proper loft insulation, you can improve the energy efficiency of your home and increase your eligibility for a heat pump in the future. As mentioned earlier, an EPC will be required after the insulation works to demonstrate that the lofts and cavities (if applicable) have been properly insulated.


I note there are new tariffs available specifically for heat pumps that may enable you to make even further savings. These could be investigated in the design stage when choosing an installer and potentially a new energy supplier.

Phase 03

Major Heating and Hot Water

Air Source Heat Pump

Cost:

£11993

Savings:

£120.00

CO2 Savings:

3410.00kg

All figures are estimated

Reasoning for this measure

Air Source Heat Pumps, when installed correctly alongside the upgrade of existing pipework and radiators, can significantly reduce carbon emissions, as demonstrated by the Annual CO2 Savings. However, since electricity is currently more expensive than gas, the energy bill savings are typically lower than expected.


During our discussion, we briefly considered the installation of an Air Source Heat Pump but determined that addressing the roof and single glazing should take priority. In retrofit projects, a "Fabric First" approach is often encouraged, as the most cost-effective energy is the energy we don't consume. However, if you aim to significantly reduce your carbon emissions, it may be worth considering the early installation of an Air Source Heat Pump in your plan.


Please note that extensive upgrades to pipework and radiators are often necessary, including increasing the size of existing radiators, particularly in older properties. Contractors should conduct a Heat Pump assessment before submitting their proposal to determine the extent of the required works for heat pump installation. Grants are currently available for Air Source Heat Pumps in homes that have a valid Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) with no outstanding recommendations for loft or cavity wall insulation (source: link). The grant levels for heat pumps have been increased to £7,500, with funding confirmed until March 2028.


By establishing the presence of cavity walls and insulating them, as well as ensuring proper loft insulation, you can improve the energy efficiency of your home and increase your eligibility for a heat pump in the future. As mentioned earlier, an EPC will be required after the insulation works to demonstrate that the lofts and cavities (if applicable) have been properly insulated.


I note there are new tariffs available specifically for heat pumps that may enable you to make even further savings. These could be investigated in the design stage when choosing an installer and potentially a new energy supplier.

Summary of improvements in phase 03

Air Source Heat Pump
Estimated Cost
£11993
Grant available
Energy Rating
+4
Monthly Savings
£10.00
Estimated Annual Savings
£120.00
Monthly CO2 Savings
284.17kg
Annual CO2 Savings
3410.00kg
Totals
Estimated Cost
£11993
Energy Rating
-
Monthly Savings
£10.00
Estimated Annual Savings
£120.00
Monthly CO2 Savings
284.17kg
Annual CO2 Savings
3410.00kg

Heat Pump grant savings - Boiler Upgrade Scheme

The cost we show for a heat pump measure in your Plan, does not take into account the £7,500 grant available from the Boiler Upgrade Scheme (BUS). Most people getting a heat pump will qualify for this, so please discuss this with us to confirm your eligibility.

Selected Improvements

Preparing for your consultation

If you'd like to discuss a change to the phasing of your project, you can create a custom list of improvements here. Simply click 'Add to plan' beneath the improvement information above. We can then discuss your list in your consultation call.

Please note

Compiling this list is optional. There's no need to add any improvements to this list if you're happy with the existing phases.

Estimated Total Savings
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Total Cost
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Project Considerations

The purpose of these considerations

Your retrofit coordinator has detailed below the points of notes for your project. These are things to explore or confirm before the project starts.

We'll work with you to ensure they are understood and discuss further details as helpful.

Not all considerations are essential

Some of these considerations may not be essential for the project to begin. Consult the details below to understand if any are critical to your progress.

Any questions on these considerations? Let's discuss them on your consultation call.

Air Tightness Testing

Air tightness testing is a method used to measure the air leakage of a building. It is an important test to ensure that your home is not losing unnecessary heat and that the insulation measures are effective. This is also used to assess the property’s background ventilation.

Planning Permission

Planning permission is a legal requirement for some types of retrofit work, particularly when the works affect the exterior of the property. Your Retrofit Coordinator can provide guidance on this.

Party Wall Agreement

A party wall survey is required if the works affect a wall that is shared with a neighbouring property and determine legal rights and responsibilities, particularly for managing the costs or damages incurred. A Party Wall Notice requirement does not necessarily require a surveyor unless it goes to a dispute.

Listed Building Consent

Listed building consent is a legal permission required in the UK to make any changes to a listed building that might affect its special architectural or historic interest.

Next steps

Stage 1 summary

The first stage of your Furbnow journey includes your survey, this Home Energy Plan and a consultation call. Our objective is to give you clarity on the most fitting home energy improvements for your home.

Wrapping up stage 1

Once you've reviewed this plan, book your consultation call to discuss any questions or changes to this plan. The consultation sees your plan finalised and we agree on how best to progress your project through the stages 2 and 3 below.

Stage 2: Design and Tender

We'll confirm the best installers for your project

  • Prepare design requirements for the project

  • Shortlist of installers in your area

  • Request quotes from shortlisted installers

  • Check quotes to ensure they're reasonable

  • Review installer designs to ensure the technical approach is correct

  • Ad hoc advice throughout the tender process

  • Installers confirmed and scheduled

Stage 3: Project delivery and assurance

We will oversee the delivery of your project

  • Installers coordinated on your behalf

  • Weekly progress and schedule updates

  • Site visits at key project stages to ensure all works are to standard

  • Ad hoc advice throughout the works at your home

  • Option for site visit

  • We will ensure all measures are installed

  • Final quality review and sign-off on your project

Extra Information

Our Methodology

Your Average monthly energy bills

We assessed your home using the nationally accepted methodology for calculations that underpins the Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) regime for all UK homes, but we dont rely solely on its calculations.

Caveats

Costs in this Home Energy Plan are indicative and subject to change. They are not quotations and do not include preliminaries and professional fees such as scaffolding and architectural services, which cannot be estimated at this stage. Quotations are requested as part of Stage 2: Design and Tender.

Inflation

Budgeted costs are based on current information and market prices. Your costs may increase due to inflation, which is hard to predict in the construction industry due to the nature of the workforce and currency sensitivity.

Confidence Score

The confidence score for this survey is 9/10

Your confidence score refers to the level of certainty or reliability associated with the survey data.

A higher confidence score indicates greater accuracy and precision in the collected data. This means the surveyors are more certain that the information is reliable.

Ready to discuss your project?